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About the Stories
Introduction
The Stories
The Writers

About the Stories
Scribbling Women Home PageAbout the StoriesAdapting the StoriesTeaching ToolsResourcesFeatured Plays



Featured Dramatizations

A Whisper in the Dark
by Louisa May Alcott


The Martyr
by Katherine Anne Porter


A Wagner Matinee
by Willa Cather


Life in the Iron Mills
by Rebecca Harding Davis


Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
by Harriet Jacobs


The Schoolmaster's Progress
by Caroline Kirkland


Louisa
by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman


Cassy
by Harriet Beecher Stowe


The Stones of the Village
by Alice Dunbar-Nelson


Letters of a Woman Homesteader and Letters on an Elk Hunt
by Elinore Pruitt Stewart


The Shadowy Third
by Ellen Glasgow


Sweat
by Zora Neale Hurston


At the 'Cadian Ball
by Kate Chopin


The Merry-Go-Round
by Julia Peterkin


The Flight of Betsey Lane
by Sarah Orne Jewett


Afterward
by Edith Wharton


The Yellow Wallpaper
by Charlotte Perkins Gilman


A Jury of Her Peers
by Susan Glaspell

in Windows Media



The Stories

The Schoolmaster's Progress
by Caroline Kirkland, published 1844
dramatized by Donna DiNovelli and directed by Martin Jenkins

A tale of mischief, romantic intrigue, and a community's growing pains on the Western frontier.

Cassy
by Harriet Beecher Stowe, published 1851
dramatized by Eliza Anderson and directed by Martin Jenkins

An attic hidaway, and an ingenious escape strategy devised by the slave, Cassy, are central to this excerpt from Beecher Stowe's masterpiece.

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
by Harriet Jacobs, published 1861
dramatized by Kathleen Cahill and directed by David Zoffoli

The first-person account of the heroism of a mother who devotes her life to rescuing her children from slavery.

Life in the Iron Mills
by Rebecca Harding Davis, published 1861
dramatized by Karen Cronacher and directed by David Zoffoli

Set against the pounding pulse of the fiery mills, Rebecca Harding Davis' depiction of two characters' attempt to escape a life of slavish labor is a ringing condemnation of the ills of the industrial age.

 

A Whisper in the Dark 
by Louisa May Alcott, published 1863
dramatized by Eliza Anderson and directed by Judy Braha

A dead woman's whisper from the past haunts the young heroine of Alcott's Gothic tale. There are wrongs that cannot be righted.

 

Louisa
by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, published 1891
dramatized by Eliza Anderson and directed by David Zoffoli

In a gentle story of endurance, hardship, and stubborn optimism, a young woman refuses to marry a man she doesn't love, even though his prosperity would save her family from destitution.

 

The Yellow Wallpaper 
by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, published 1892
dramatized by Laura Harrington and directed by David Zoffoli

In this classic treatment of the reality behind women's 'hysteria', Charlotte Perkins Stetson Gilman portrays a late nineteenth century woman's descent into madness.

 

The Flight of Betsey Lane
by Sarah Orne Jewett, published 1893
dramatized by Eliza Anderson and directed by David Zoffoli

A story of an aging woman living on a poor-farm in Maine in the late 1800s and the unexpected fulfilment of her dream.

 

At the 'Cadian Ball
by Kate Chopin, published 1894
Dramatized by Laura Harrington and Directed by Nora Hussey

In the Acadian country of south central Louisiana, one maiden teases another about her rumored rendezvous with a young man. Love seems to be in the air, but it is the kind that heats instead of soothes the passions.

 

A Wagner Matinee 
by Willa Cather, published 1904
dramatized by Sara Baker and directed by Martin Jenkins

When Clark Hamilton's aunt, a former musician, travels to Boston from her home in rural Nebraska, Clark is reminded of the wrenching contrast between rural and city life, the dangers of love, and the price his aunt willingly paid for her life choices.

 

The Stones of the Village
by Alice Dunbar-Nelson, published 1910
Dramatized by Eliza Anderson and Directed by Martin Jenkins

This is a tale that describes the perils of racial ambivalence. Neither romanticizing nor demonizing "one drop" of black-or white-blood, the author dramatizes the costs of rejecting any part of one's heritage.

 

Afterward 
by Edith Wharton, published 1910
dramatized by Donna DiNovelli and directed by Martin Jenkins

In this ghostly tale shadows begin to surface in what appears to be a perfect marriage when a strange visitor begins to make his presence known.

 

Letters of a Woman Homesteader and Letters on an Elk Hunt 
by Elinore Pruitt Stewart, published in 1914 and 1915
directed by Martin Jenkins

Elinore Pruitt Stewart wrote letters to all her friends describing her life as a homesteader in Wyoming in the early part of the 20th century. Many were published in the Atlantic Monthly magazine thus preserving them for future readers. In this hour long abridged version of her letters we enter into the world Elinore Pruitt Stewart knew and loved.

 

The Shadowy Third 
by Ellen Glasgow, published 1916
dramatized by Gerry Jones and directed by Martin Jenkins

A chilling tale of a young nurse, a ghostly child, and a distinguished physician who "crossed his will with invisible powers."

 

A Jury of Her Peers
by Susan Glaspell, published 1917
dramatized by Donna DiNovelli and directed by David Zoffoli

 A murder investigation at a rural Iowa farmhouse turns into a study of how men and women experience their worlds differently.

 

The Merry-Go-Round
by Julia Peterkin, published 1921
dramatized by Laura Harrington and directed by John Theocharis

In a tale set in South Carolina in the late 19th century, an itinerant, white carousel barker tries to seduce a black girl. Her boyfriend fights the barker who awaits his opportunity for revenge.

 

The Martyr
by Katherine Anne Porter, published 1923
dramatized by Eliza Anderson and directed by Martin Jenkins

An illustrious Mexican painter's passionate love for his model leads him to a martyr's death.

 

Sweat
by Zora Neale Hurston, published 1926
dramatized by Kia Corthron and directed by Martin Jenkins

Delia Jones is tormented by her husband, Sykes. However, when Sykes' own cruelty turns on him, Delia is the only one who might save him from death.

 

Hate is Nothing 
by Marita Bonner, published 1938
dramatized by Rebecca Johnson and directed by Judy Braha

Rich in ambiance of 1930's urban America, this story of conflict between a black woman and her mother-in-law teaches volumes about class and color snobbery in America.

 

The Bones of Louella Brown 
by Ann Petry, published 1947
dramatized by Laura Harrington and directed by Robert Scanlan

Ann Petry's comedy of early nineteen-twenties Boston exhumes not only the bodies of the dead, but the racism of the living.

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radio play logo   Dr. Deborah Hooker, Director
Women's and Gender Studies
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies
NC State University
    Send inquiries to dahooker@ncsu.edu

Copyright © 2013 Women's and Gender Studies - Department of Interdisciplinary Studies - NC State University